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Lankham Bottom: from top to bottom

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Lankham Bottom: from top to bottom

I suspect that unless you are a member of the Dorset branch of Butterfly Conservation you will never have heard of the Lankham Bottom nature reserve let alone have paid it a visit. That is a shame as it really is a very interesting site with a lot to offer the botanist and entomologist as well as the casual observer. Given its lack of visitors there are no visitor facilities and rightly so. Lankham Bottom is a wild place and should stay that way.

The land is actually owned by the local water company and in the middle of the site is a small pumping station (or at least I assume that is what it is). However, apart from this small building and the track running down to it from the main entrance along with a few overhead wires and their posts there is no human activity on the site apart from the priceless efforts of the Butterfly Conservation volunteers who help keep the site in pristine condition for its populations of butterflies.

The reserve covers a much larger area than I had expected and it is a form of bowl with three high and steep sides around a lower centre. You have to descend from the top of the sides down and up again as you make you way around and much of the time you have to do this without the benefit of footpaths; Lankham Bottom is not accessible by anyone not reasonably fit and active.

Being primarily chalk there are lots of calcareous soil loving flowers (including orchids) and they attract all sorts of insects, not just butterflies and day flying moths but beetles, flies and bugs. Mid to late summer are undoubtedly the best times to visit. 


 

If you would like to see the complete series that this post is part of click here ---->
This nature note was written by ----> Peter Orchard
This nature nore was written ----> 2 years 11 months ago

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