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Trailing St Johns-wort: the procumbent hypericum

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Trailing St Johns-wort: the procumbent hypericum

In general St John's-worts are fine, upstanding members of the plant community, the exception being trailing St John's-wort (Hypericum humifusum) which is a prostrate plant with a thin stem unable to support the weight of the small, vibrant, rich yellow star shaped flowers. The flowers usually have a few black dots on them otherwise they are typical of the Hypericum family. Humifuse means spread over the surface of the groundprocumbent.

Found usually in woodland it tends to be woodland where the soil is acid and so it is most likely to be found in oak/birch woodland rather than ancient broad leaf woodland. It is also frequently found in conifer plantations on the heathland areas of Dorset, especially Purbeck.

It flowers from June to September and whilst not common in Dorset in my experience it is quite widespread in suitable habitat. Care should be taken not confuse this with either yellow pimpernel or creeping Jenny


 

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This nature note was written by ----> Peter Orchard
This nature nore was written ----> 2 years 2 weeks ago

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