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Two-spot Ladybird: spot the difference

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Two-spot Ladybird: spot the difference

If you see a red ladybird do not assume it is the familiar seven-spot that one commonly sees, there are ten or so red ladybird species although several are quite scarce unless you are in the right place at the right time! You need to count the spots to get an idea which species you are looking at and a red ladybird with a black spot on each wing case (elytra) will be the two-spot ladybird (Adalia bipunctata) ... one plus one equals two! The seven spot has three and a half on each wing case making it appear like seven.

The two-spot is very common here in the south from March right on through until November and can be seen on vegetation of all sorts, especially shrubs, and occurs frequently in gardens. It is, however, quite variable in colour and can be almost totally black although this is a variation seen more often in the north of Britain as it helps them absorb more heat.

So, if you see a red ladybird take time to see if you can spot the difference.


 

If you would like to see the complete series that this post is part of click here ---->
This nature note was written by ----> Peter Orchard
This nature nore was written ----> 1 year 10 months ago

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